• College Admissions Reform

Episode 32 ***🚨EMERGENCY AUNT BECKY SCANDAL PODCAST With Eric Hoover🚨***

This week it became known via a federal indictment that rich people used their wealth to break the law in a variety of appalling ways, all with a mind to skip the line and receive guaranteed admission to famous/elite/highly-selective colleges. Nobody knows more about this world than Chronicle of Higher Education reporter Eric Hoover…let’s unpack #AuntBeckyGate emergency-style!

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  • Why College?

Welcome to the Crush!

cropped-THE_CRUSH_04_CAP-6-0-00-00-04_1-1.jpgThis is a podcast where I talk to really interesting people about the factors that contribute to the love and fear of this (mostly) American rite of passage called “College.” Learn more about this show, get updates, engage and share ideas.
  • College Athletics
  • The Business of College Admissions
  • Explicit

Episode 30! Josh Hunt on “The University of Nike”

Nike and Oregon – the state as well as its flagship university – go way back, and their relationship became a template for underfunded state universities all over the country. Josh Hunt takes a deep dive into this complicated and painful reality in his new book, “The University of Nike: How Corporate Cash Bought American Higher Education.”

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  • College Counseling
  • Podcasts

Episode 29: Emmi Harward of ACCIS

Emmi Harward is the Executive Director of the Association of College Counselors in Independent Schools (ACCIS), and it’s her job to keep her finger on the pulse of the college counseling profession so she can help her members do their best work helping kids apply to college.

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  • College Applications
  • The Business of College Admissions

Episode 28: Annie Reznik on the Coalition Application

The Coalition for Access, Affordability, and Success emerged 3 years ago to provide an alternative application platform for, at first, 32 colleges, and now over 150 of them. Executive Director Annie Reznik is helping this group of colleges execute a mission to improve the college attendance and graduation chances for more of the kinds of students who don’t go and don’t graduate.

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  • Community Colleges

Episode 26: Bart Grachan on Community Colleges

6 million people attend community colleges in this country, and yet we somehow don’t tend to consider it as “college.”

Bart Grachan earns his keep doing everything he can to help students succeed at LaGuardia Community College, and also to helping us all change the conversation to include these students, their concerns as well as their successes.

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  • Podcasts
  • The Business of College Admissions

Episode 25: Alexander Clark, CEO and Founder of Technolutions/Slate

It’s a company with a loyal following to rival almost any brand, and everyone in college admissions is buying it. Slate is the technology of choice that admissions offices use to read applications and manage every interaction that students make with that office, from mailing list subscription to every click on an email to admission notification.

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  • Politics of Education
  • Race in College

Episode 24: Stanley Nelson on HBCUs and His New Film “Tell Them We Are Rising”

 

Stanley Nelson has been making movies for a long time, and his latest film – airing Monday, February 19th on PBS – called “Tell Them We Are Rising” is the first of its kind fo explore the topic of Historically Black Colleges and Universities or HBCUs.
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  • ECONOMICS OF HIGHER ED

Episode 23: Prof. Nathan Grawe on the Changing Demographics of America’s College Bound

 

Professor Nathan Grawe of Carleton College developed a demographic model which says that ’round about 2030 this country is going to lose a giant share of its population of college-going age. How will this impact colleges and universities and how will it impact each kind of higher education environment? I talked to him about his book “Demographics and the Demand for Higher Education” to learn more.

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  • College Admissions Reform

Episode 21: Scott Looney on the Mastery Transcript

 

The Mastery Transcript Consortium (MTC) is a group of over 150 private schools that have coalesced around an idea that our current model of grading students is not only outdated, but harmful to their development. Scott Looney is the Head of School at the Hawken School in Cleveland, Ohio, and is the driving force behind the Mastery Transcript, a brand-new way to consider how we assess student achievements in high school.  Read More

  • Standardized Tests

Episode 20: Akil Bello Helps me Register for the SAT

 

Akil Bello is a friend of mine who is also one of these odd sorts who concerns himself in life with all things Standardized Test. Following up from Episode 4 where I pledge to take the SAT, I finally sit down to register to do it, which in itself can take up to an hour. Naturally, I thought this would make for gripping radio. We document this epic experience of simply registering for the exam and attempt to read the minds – and fine print rivaling the iTunes terms of service – of the College Boarders who’ve put this experience together.

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  • Learning in the Digital Space

Episode 19: Dr. Andrew Ho on the Reach of MOOCs

So we have literally all of humanity’s knowledge at our fingertips thanks to the Internet, and Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs) are making it easier to get more education to more people for free. Dr. Andrew Ho has done research on MOOCs and their impact and assessing the knowledge obtained in a MOOC such that any credential you receive after passing a class matters in the marketplace. 

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  • ECONOMICS OF HIGHER ED

Episode 18: Prof. Doug Webber on NY’s “Excelsior” Scholarship

New York’s Governor Andrew Cuomo recently championed and passed the nation’s first plan to offer free college tuition to state residents attending state public colleges called “The Excelsior Scholarship.” Free always sounds good, but does it make for good policy? Professor Doug Webber, a labor economist at Temple University who has contributed to fivethirtyeight.com, Fortune, and has testified before congress on matters of higher education, helps us understand what about this plan is good, and what about this plan might actually be really bad policy. We use NY Times columnist David Brooks’ scathing 8-point critique (“The Cuomo College Fiasco” NYT 4/14/17) as a frame for this discussion.  Read More

  • Bias in Application Review

Episode 17: Dr. Michael Bastedo on the Bias of Admissions Counselors

Right now, college applicants are anxiously waiting to hear back from the colleges they applied to, while legions of admissions counselors read their applications and those of anywhere from hundreds to thousands of their fellow applicants. That’s a lot of decisions to make. How are they made? What influences that process? What can research tell us about how to do it better so that we can be fair to students and their circumstances, while also being fair to the admissions counselors and their (physical, mental, emotional, marital) health? University of Michigan School of Education Professor Dr. Michael Bastedo has done research on exactly these questions, and I caught him at the NACAC conference in Columbus OH this fall to ask him about his research.

  • Politics of Education

Episode 16.2: Lew Frederick on the Question “Is Donald Trump Racist?”

DSC_0129I needed to go back to something that I think Oregon State Representative Lew Frederick is uniquely qualified to talk about and something that’s been on my mind almost every day since about the 2nd presidential debate: and that is, is Donald Trump racist? And if he is, how should we feel about that? More specifically what does it mean if you vote for him? What does it mean if I know people who are voting for him, does that make them racist? I veered from the path of this podcast’s mission of discussing higher education in this one instance because the opportunity presented itself and in my mind and placed it into it’s own “part 2” and I called Lew back to ask him some of these questions.

  • Politics of Education

Episode 16: Rep. Lew Frederick on Race, Politics, and Education

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As a candidate running unopposed for the State Senate of Oregon from a Portland district, Lew Frederick stands to be one of the most if not the most influential black politicians in the state of Oregon, which makes him one of the most influential black politicians in this country. I wouldn’t normally use the qualifier “black” but Lew is one of two elected officials in the state legislature who are black and that characteristic is particularly meaningful especially in this day and age as we consider the direction of society and the politicians who want to direct it. He’s been active in politics his whole life, and active in the politics of Oregon – and apropos of this podcast, Oregon’s systems of education – for decades.

Learn more about Lew and his work here: http://www.lewfrederick.org/

Here is an article referenced in the episode: “This is why finland has the best schools.” http://www.smh.com.au/national/this-is-why-finland-has-the-best-schools-20160324-gnqv9l.html

  • Science Research

Episode 15: Dr. Christina Warinner on 10,000 Year Old Teeth, Science Research, and Women in Academia

 

christina-warinnerDr. Christina Warinner works at the University of Oklahoma’s Laboratories of Molecular Anthropology and Microbiome Research (LMAMR) and studies some incredibly cool and incredibly small things: the bacteria in the teeth of our ancient ancestors. She does this to learn about our ancient diet in an attempt to gain insight into the nature of periodontal disease. I interviewed her because I wanted to learn more about this stuff, and also to have her provide insight into the value of doing research as a component of your college education, and what it’s like to be a woman making an academic career in science. Oh also: The “Paleo Diet” is silly and she can prove it. Read More

  • Adjunct Faculty

Episode 14: Maria Maisto on the Struggle of Adjunct Faculty

Maria MaistoMaria Maisto is the Executive Director of the New Faculty Majority, an organization fighting to improve working conditions for adjunct and contingent faculty at American institutions of higher ed. The name grew out of the reality that only in recent history has higher ed leaned on adjuncts to the degree that they comprise 75% of the teaching workforce.

They’re members of the “faculty,” at 75% of the teaching labor force in higher education they are the “majority,” and it’s “new” because a combination of factors have only recently made them the unstable majority of the teaching workforce.  Read More

  • College Admissions Reform

Episode 12: Lloyd Thacker and Rick Weissbourd on “Turning the Tide”

LloydThacker

richard-weissbourd

Rick Weissbourd and Lloyd Thacker are new partners trying to solve an entrenched problem: How can college admissions change to better encourage healthier student outcomes and to promote ethical engagement in their communities? Their “Turning the Tide” report is their best and latest stab at it.

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  • Student Stress

Episode 11: Denise Pope on The Pressure to Succeed in High School

denise head shot far 2012

Dr. Denise Pope is a professor of education at Stanford and a founder of “Challenge Success,” an organization that “partners with schools and families to provide kids with the academic, social, and emotional skills needed to succeed now and in the future.” She’s out to reduce stress among teenagers through a variety of methods including a reduction in homework and more sleep. These were two of my favorite concepts when I was in high school, but for some strange reason even the students are pushing back.

Follow me on Twitter @crushpod – visit www.crushpodcast.com for more info – Subscribe and rate The Crush on iTunes! Read More

  • Money

Episode 10.1: Jon Burdick on Money and College

Jon BurdickJon Burdick is the VP of Enrollment and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at the University of Rochester. He was also my admissions counselor when I went to USC, and now he’s my boss. He’s also one of the more articulate (and relatively fearless) thinkers and speakers on all things college, so I put the money questions to him. It took up almost two hours, so I’ve split it into two parts.

This is part 1! Follow Jon on Twitter @deanburdick

Follow me on Twitter @crushpod — Like the show on Facebook www.facebook.com/crushpodcast — Subscribe and rate the show on on iTunes! Read More

  • Money

Episode 10.2: Jon Burdick on Money and College

Jon BurdickJon Burdick is the VP of Enrollment and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid at the University of Rochester. He was also my admissions counselor when I went to USC, and now he’s my boss. He’s also one of the more articulate (and relatively fearless) thinkers and speakers on all things college, so I put the money questions to him. It took up almost two hours, so I’ve split it into two parts.

This is part 2!

Follow Jon on Twitter @deanburdick — Follow me on Twitter @crushpod — Like the show on Facebook www.facebook.com/crushpodcast — Subscribe and rate the show on on iTunes!

  • Sweet Gig

Episode 09: Genevieve Bell, Intel’s Anthropologist

genevieve-bell
As a full-time anthropologist at Intel (recruited at a bar in Palo Alto off the faculty at Stanford), Genevieve Bell has a job that makes a lot of us go, “Wow…what’s that?” She sits at the intersection between anthropology and computer science, and as such, a big part of what she does is to help her company  – and by extension us – understand the future to come, and our place as humans in an increasingly technological and data-driven world.  Read More

  • The Business of College Admissions

Episode 08: Stephanie Shyu, Co-Founder of AdmitSee

The weirdness created by a lack of obvious, consistent formula determining who gets into selective colleges makes it feel super secretive. Stephanie Shyu and her colleagues at AdmitSee think they’ve come up with a tool that can help cut through some of the static, and it’s rankling some folks in the college counseling world. Read More

  • ECONOMICS OF HIGHER ED

Episode 07: Ben Casselman, Chief Economics Writer at fivethirtyeight.com

Ben CasselmanOn March 30th, Ben Casselman blew up a Facebook group I’m a part of with about 10,000 members in it, all of them college admissions professionals in one way or another, high schcool, college, independent consultants, all of ’em. He blew it up with an article titled: “Shut Up About Harvard.” Read More

  • The Physical Design of Colleges

Episode 06: Nader Tehrani on the Look and Feel of College Campuses

Students always talk about the “feel” of a college campus being that indescribable and critical deciding factor that influences their decision to apply and eventually to enroll at a college. Are colleges supposed to feel a certain way? Why? Where’d this feeling come from and what are today’s designers thinking about when designing spaces of higher education? Nader Tehrani, former head of the architecture department at MIT and current Dean of the School of Architecture at Cooper Union helps me answer these questions and more.

 

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  • International Education

Episode 05: Dr. Siva Kumari, Director General of the IBO

siva-kumari

The International Baccalaureate, or IB, is the hardest and most thorough preparation for college out there today. Not only is it out there, but it’s really out there as a global curriculum in almost 150 countries, and it’s growing. Dr. Siva Kumari is the leader of this complex and fascinating entity, and she is also an utter delight. She spoke to me via Skype from The Hague…which is not a bad place to have an office.

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  • Standardized Tests

Episode 04: Adam Ingersoll on Standardized Tests

Adam Ingersoll

Tests suck and they suck real bad. I know because I cried the day I got my SAT scores in the mail. BUT- we need them in our lives in the college admissions world…or do we? Adam Ingersoll, is the co-founder of the west coast’s leading test prep company, Compass Education Group, and he helps us think about the value of these tests, their present and future, and whether grownups like me should take the new SAT. And then cry about it for old time’s sake. Read More

  • College Athletics
  • Explicit

Episode 03: Bob DeMars, Director of “The Business of Amateurs”

Bobby DeMars

Bob DeMars lived the dream of kids in streets and backyards everywhere when he played college football for the University of Southern California. He paid a heavy price, and entered into a fraternity he didn’t see coming. With the release of his new documentary “The Business of Amateurs,” which has been met with wide-ranging acclaim, which includes being used in John Oliver’s absolute The People’s Elbow-ing of the NCAA on “Last Week Tonight,” Bob hopes to spread the word to kids before they make the decisions he and the film’s subjects did.

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  • Sweet Gig

Episode 02: Emily Harris, Jerusalem Correspondent for NPR

emily-in-gazaEmily Harris has an incredible job as the Jerusalem correspondent for National Public Radio. How do you get a job like that, and how do you prepare for it in college? (Hint: You kind of don’t.) Being a radio correspondent in Jerusalem requires a pretty diverse skill set. How did college prepare Emily for her job? (Photo credit: Ahmed Abuhamda for NPR) Read More

  • Why College?

Episode 01: What’s the Point of College? With Bill Deresiewicz

 

BillDeresciewicz

So what’s the point of college? Bill Deresiewicz wrote the book “Excellent Sheep: The Miseducation of the American Elite and the Way to a Meaningful Life” which I’ve come to regard as one of the most important books about college available today. The nature of going to college has changed dramatically from its early inception, and economic forces have shifted the conversation away from developing people into better human beings and citizens, to one based on “return on investment.” What’s the point of going to college, anyways? Bill Deriesewicz has some compelling ideas. WARNING: The F-word gets said one time. By me. Sorry.  Read More